Author Archives: Jonathan Clatworthy

Poems for justice (3)

This is the third of three posts about the ancient Hebrew prophet Micah, based on sermons I preached at St Brides Liverpool. This one is about what we mean by peace. It focuses on Micah’s vision of everyone sitting under … Continue reading

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The meaning of life in East and West

Harvard Professor Michael Puett’s lecture last night was as challenging as it was entertaining. The title was ‘Chinese Philosophy and the Meaning of Life’. I had no idea that the strongest values of western culture were about to be turned … Continue reading

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Climate change: more hubris won’t stop it

John Vaillant’s shocking description of the recent fires in California, hotter than anything seen before, melting everything in urban landscapes, should wake us up to the future awaiting us all if we carry on with our destructive lifestyles. Now, the … Continue reading

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Poems for justice (2)

This is the second of 3 posts about the ancient Hebrew prophet Micah, based on sermons I preached at St Brides Liverpool. This one is about the relationship between justice and fairness. The first describes how Micah lived in a … Continue reading

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Poems for Justice (1)

Central Liverpool’s food bank, previously known as Hope+, has now been renamed Micah Liverpool. In its honour I was asked to introduce the Hebrew prophet Micah in three sermons at St Brides’ Church. This one is based on Micah 6:1-8, … Continue reading

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The origins of the Eucharist: not what you may have thought

Eucharist, Communion, Mass, Lord’s Supper. For the first Christians, it was their central activity. It was what they gathered for. Why? The usual story goes like this. On the day before he died, Jesus gathered with the twelve apostles for … Continue reading

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Boris Corbyn’s anti-them-ism

Antisemitism with Jeremy Corbyn, anti-Islamism with Boris Johnson: how do they compare? This post is not about the issues themselves but about the way they are being publicly debated and what this tells us about our declining public ethics.

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New Directions for the Church 10: offer hope

This is the last in my series of posts on new directions for the Church. After this, instead of telling it what it should be saying, I hope to focus on saying it myself. This is a plea for the … Continue reading

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New directions for the Church 9: break down the barriers

This post continues my series on possible futures for the Church. Here I argue that we need to break down barriers. Church culture today loves its barriers. It loves to emphasise what makes Christianity different from other faith traditions, or … Continue reading

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The upside-down debate on assisted dying

Logically it ought to be the other way round. As David Seymour’s proposed assisted dying bill divides New Zealand, Jonathan Rees describes the debate between Anglican bishops. Two retired and one assistant bishop think assisted dying is ‘a good and … Continue reading

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